Cart Safety: Oct 2021 Safety & Hygiene Corner

Question:  Our facility moves materials on carts, and I heard that the cart’s casters can affect how easy the carts are to move.  Is that true? 

Answer:  Yes!  The wrong type of casters on a cart will make it more difficult to move.  If you have carts that are difficult to move or are purchasing new carts, work with a knowledgeable vendor to assist you with selecting the correct caster and wheel combination for your specific cart, task and workplace conditions.  The following are some key points that you should be providing to your vendor:

  • The weight of the cart, load weight, and load type to determine number of casters required and wheel options. 
  • The types of surfaces the cart will traverse to optimize the wheel’s rollability and reliability.  Include concerns with potential noise (i.e. hospital) or floor debris when selecting the wheel type for your floor surfaces. 
  • The purpose of the cart, cart type, and height restrictions will need to be factored in when determining the cart’s wheel size. The size of wheel is a major factor in rollability of a cart.  Typically, a larger wheel will reduce the forces to move a cart. 
  • Review the path of travel, capacity, and space constraints to determine the requirement and location of swivel casters. 
  • Provide information for any environmental elements, such as extreme heat or wet environments, to ensure compatibility with the caster and wheel materials and bearings.   

Don’t forget about preventative maintenance!  Implement a preventative maintenance schedule per the manufacture’s specifications to keep those push/pull forces from increasing.

If you are concerned with the forces required to move your carts or you aren’t for sure if it is an injury risk, please contact your local BWC Ergonomist or request their service on-line at Ohio BWC – Request consulting services.  Ergonomist can determine if the push/pull forces pose a risk of a workplace injury and provide solutions to lower the risk.  Please remember that BWC’s safety consultation services are included in your BWC premiums.  

*Provided by the Ohio BWC safety consultants.

Oct 6, 2021 – Ohio Safety Council MEGA Meeting!

Join us for the first of two free webinars hosted by BWC in coordination with Ohio Safety Council sponsors!

Click here to view the official flyer that contains the access link.

Wednesday, October 6, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET
Leading from Your Heart!™

You want to achieve zero-incident culture for safety—who doesn’t? But what does it really take to
get to that point? For starters, it takes great leadership, coaching, and engagement. This inspiring
keynote, which parallels servant leadership principles, is infused with humor, and will reveal
seven contemporary and empirically based principles that will move your people from superficial
compliance to deeper and more durable forms of personal commitment to safety. You’ll leave this talk
with actionable ways to:
• Impact attitudes and actions in deeper and broader ways for three especially important types of
changes in attitudes and actions
• Turn your followers into safety leaders and champions
Develop a culture where safety is viewed as vital to the health of your organization by also experiencing
positive changes in productivity, quality, and morale.

Presented by David J. Sarkus, MS, CSP

David J. Sarkus, MS, CSP is Chief Servant Leader and Founder of David
Sarkus International Inc., a leading health and safety management
consulting and training firm based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. David is a
motivational safety speaker who delivers keynotes, training, and consulting
in a broad variety of industries. His experience, education, and leadership
qualities have allowed him and his firm to successfully apply strategies and
tactics within a large variation of mainstream work-processes for over 30
years. His customized safety interventions have produced improvements
in key performance indicators from 35% to more than 85% over the previous year. He’s proven that
results like this are not only possible, but scalable and sustainable.


Sarkus holds Master of Science degrees in both safety management and
organizational psychology. He is a recognized leader in the practice of safety
management and has written cover stories for major industry magazines
including Professional Safety and Industrial Safety & Hygiene News. He
has been recognized by ISHN as one of the “Top 50 Leaders” in the field. He
has written five books and over 100 evidence-based articles.


Sarkus works with some of the biggest and best run organizations in
the world and can help you move toward— and embrace— sustainable
excellence in safety.

At the scheduled date and time, click here to join this live event. You do not need
to pre-register.

Seat belts & Claims: Sept 2021 Safety & Hygiene Corner

Q:  If I am driving a company vehicle and I am involved in an accident that is not my fault AND I am injured AND not wearing my seatbelt, could BWC deny my claim?

A:  So, it sounds as if you are potentially concerned that if you aren’t wearing your seatbelt that the claim could be denied.  Remember, the BWC is no fault insurance – if the injured worker was in the course and scope of employment and is injured, the employee is eligible for workers’ compensation benefits.

So, in this hypothetical circumstance, the employer could discipline the injured worker for not following safety policies, etc. but that would have no impact on the allowance of the claim.

As a best practice – I would encourage the Employer to develop, document, conduct training and implement a seatbelt policy and align themselves with the law.  Wearing a seatbelt is the law!

The BWC has a sample driver safety written program at : https://info.bwc.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/bwc/for-employers/safety-and-training/safety-video-library/Written-Safety-Program-Templates

*Provided by the Ohio BWC safety consultants.

Free BWC Webinars – Sept 2021

BWC is hosting a number of occupational safety and health webinars and virtual classes in September including:

              Weekly Webinars –presented live with BWC discount program & continuing education credits

  • So you had a Claim, Now What? (September 14)

Virtual classes –

  • Violence in the Workplace (September 8)
  • Emergency Preparedness Planning Half-day Workshop (September 16)
  • Health Hazards and Toxicology Fundamentals (September 28 & 29)
  • Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Awareness (September 30)

Online E-Courses

  • Bloodborne Pathogens, Developing a Safety Culture, OSHA Recordkeeping 101 and others

Additional information on all September distance learning, including registration, is found in the attached flyer.

For more information or assistance when registering, contact the staff member listed or dshcc@bwc.state.oh.us.

Click here to view the flyer.

Flammable Storage Codes: August 2021 Safety & Hygiene Corner

What is required per OSHA and NFPA Codes for Flammable Storage Cabinets?

You are aware of what flammable storage cabinets look like; but do you know what is required per OSHA and NFPA Codes.  We receive a lot of questions regarding flammable storage cabinets, so here are some answers.  This safety corner will address some of the key code requirements.

How much flammable material can I store in one cabinet? –  OSHA and NFPA have a maximum capacity not more than 60 gallons of Category 1, 2, or 3 flammable liquids and not more than 120 gallons of Category 4 flammable liquids may be stored in a storage cabinet.

What is required in the design of flammable cabinets? Flammable cabinet must have a degree of fire resistance.   This is defined in 1910.106(d)(3)(ii) as construction shall limit the internal temperature to not more than 325 degrees F, when subjected to a 10-minute fire test using the standard time-temperature curve as set forth in NFPA 251-1969. All joints and seams shall remain tight and the door shall remain securely closed during the fire test. Cabinets shall be labeled in conspicuous lettering, “Flammable – Keep Fire Away”.  Metal flammable cabinets meet code requirements when the bottom, top, door, and sides of cabinet shall be at least No. 18 gage sheet iron and double walled with 1 1/2 – inch air space. Joints shall be riveted, welded or made tight by some equally effective means. The door shall be provided with a three-point lock, and the door sill shall be raised at least 2 inches above the bottom of the cabinet.

What should I look for when auditing flammable cabinets?

  • Grounding and bonding of the cabinet and any containers you are dispensing from inside the cabinet must be in place.
  • Doors need to be keep closed unless in use and all three points of contact on the doors must be in good working condition. 
  • Cabinet bungs must be in place and secure.  
  • Clearly labeled.
  • Text Box: Figure 1 Photo- OSHA Office of Training and EducationNot located near forklift or equipment access. 
  • Not be placed in aisleways used for emergency egress.

*Provided by the Ohio BWC safety consultants.

Free BWC Webinars – August 2021

BWC is hosting a number of occupational safety and health webinars and virtual classes in August including:

              Weekly Webinars –presented live with BWC discount program & continuing education credits

  • Engaging Millennials in Safety (August 10)
  • Advice on Creating a Successful Safety & Health Management Program (August 11)
  • The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Safety Teams (August 12)
  • BWC Transitional Work Program and Updates (August 24)

Virtual classes –

  • Lockout/Tagout and Safety-Related Work Practices (August 4)
  • Work Zone Traffic Control and Safety (August 18)
  • Confined Space Assessment and Work (August 23 & 24)
  • Electrical Safety in the Workplace through Insight and Implementation of NFPA 70E (August 30 & 31)

Online E-Courses

  • Bloodborne Pathogens, Developing a Safety Culture, OSHA Recordkeeping 101 and others

Additional information on all August distance learning, including registration, is found in the attached flyer.

For more information or assistance when registering, contact the staff member listed or dshcc@bwc.state.oh.us.

Click here to view flyer.

Nail Gun Injuries: June 2021 Safety & Hygiene Corner

Question: What can I do to reduce the potential for nail gun injuries in the workplace?

Answer: According to OSHA “Nail gun injuries are common – one study found that 2 out of 5 residential carpenter apprentices experienced a nail gun injury over a four-year period”. The most common injuries are puncture wounds to the hands and fingers but there can be more serious injuries and deaths that could occur using nail guns.  The following basic steps can help reduce the potential for these injuries:

  1. Consider restricting inexperienced employees to full-sequential trigger nail guns when starting out. Full-sequential firing is considered the safest option, also called single-shot firing; full-sequential is ideal for applications such as framing and carpentry, where precision is more important than fastening speed.  Full-sequential firing is slower than bump firing.  Best Practice: color-code the nail guns so that the type of trigger can be readily identified by workers and supervisors.
  2. The safety on the nail gun relies on two basic controls:  a finger trigger and a contact safety tip located on the nose of the gun.
  3. Require proper PPE for your employees such as, safety shoes high Impact eye protection, safety glasses or goggles marked ANSI Z87.1 and hearing protection
  4. Employers should ensure that their policies and practices encourage reporting of nail gun injuries. Reporting ensures that employees get medical attention and it also helps contractors to identify unrecognized job site risks that could lead to additional injuries if not addressed.
  5. Both new and experienced workers can benefit from safety training to learn about the causes of nail gun injuries and specific steps to reduce them. Be sure that training is provided in a manner that employees can understand.

Additional nail gun safety tips:

  • Follow all manufacturer’s safe operating instructions when using a nail gun, handling & storage.
  • Ensure proper training on nail guns is conducted.
  • Ensure the tool meets all applicable OSHA guarding standards.
  • They can generate noise up to 120 dBA, hearing protection is required.
  • Keep your fingers away from the trigger when not driving nails. Do not press the trigger unless you are intending to fire.
  • Do not point the nail gun at anyone, even if it is disconnected from the air supply or supposedly empty.
  • Keep hands clear of the discharge area while firing and make sure the nail gun is pointed away from your body.
  • Place the muzzle of the nail gun firmly against the work piece when firing.
  • Inspect the power source, the nails, the trigger, and safety contact before use.
  • Always conduct prior inspections of the nail gun.  Make sure the nose guard is in working order and check the air pressure before hooking it up.
  • Do not carry the nail gun by the hose or the cord or with a finger on the trigger.
  • Disconnect the tool from the air supply before clearing blockages, adjusting, handing the nail gun to another worker or leaving it unattended.

*Provided by the Ohio BWC safety consultants.

Ohio BWC: Distance Learning in June 2021

Click here to view the flyer.

BWC is hosting a number of occupational safety and health webinars and virtual classes in June including:

              Weekly Webinars –presented live with BWC discount program & continuing education credits

  • OSHA Knocks on the Door (June 8)
  • Trenching Safety Stand Down (June 15)
  • A PERRP-spective on the Fire Chief’s Role in Compliance (June 21)
  • The fight beyond the fire: Battling carcinogens before, during and after the fireground (June 23)

Virtual classes –

  • Ergonomic Risk Factors: Understanding and  Identifying (June 1)
  • Electrical Safety in the Workplace through Insight and Implementation of NFPA 70E (June 2-3)
  • Emergency Preparedness Planning Half-day Workshop (June 8)
  • Thermal Stress (June 9)
  • Safety Series Workshop Module 4: Walking Working Surfaces and Emergency Action Plan Basics (June 17)
  • Effective Safety Teams Half-day Workshop (June 22)
  • Job Safety Analysis (June 24)
  • Safety for the Non-Safety Professional (June 29-30)

Online E-Courses

  • Bloodborne Pathogens, Developing a Safety Culture, OSHA Recordkeeping 101 and others

Additional information on all June distance learning, including registration, is found in the attached flyer.

For more information or assistance when registering, contact the staff member listed or dshcc@bwc.state.oh.us.